Books in this Blog

Here is a list of the editions we will be using, listed in the order of our discussions on the [Project D] blog:

Crime and Punishment (paperback)
Published by Vintage, 1993
Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Buy this book here

or

Crime and Punishment (hardcover)
Published by Everyman’s Library, 1993
Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Buy the book here


The Idiot (paperback)
Published by Vintage, 1993
Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Buy this book here

or

The Idiot (hardcover)
Published by Everyman’s Library, 2002
Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Buy the book here


The Demons (paperback)
Published by Vintage, 1995
Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Buy this book here

or

The Demons (hardcover)
Published by Everyman’s Library, 2000
Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Buy the book here


The Brothers Karamazov
Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2002
Translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky
Buy this book here

4 Responses to Books in this Blog

  1. John Warren says:

    Seems odd that none of these fabulous translations are available on the Kindle or other ebook devices. Why? Electronic rights issues unresolved, most likely. While other translations such as Constance Garret are available, these definitive Pevear and Volokhonsky translations are not for sale as e-books.

  2. Taylor Kirk says:

    I wondered the same thing…I went a little crazy downloading the classics onto my Kindle and noticed that most were only available in one translation (if they were translated). Still have no idea.

    • Taylor:

      If you’re reading the Constance Garnett translations, you’re fine. They’re good solid translations. I’m not sure why the Pevear and Volokhonsky translations aren’t generally available on Kindle — but, you’ll be happy to know that their translation of Demons is available on Kindle.

  3. Hank says:

    Regarding Pevear/Volokhonsky translations, I have found evidence that they have actually merely tweaked the Garnett translation.
    There is a gross mistranslation in Garnett’s Karamazoff, at the place near the beginning where the family assembles at the monastery to meet with Zosima. Someone enquires about Dmitry, and the answer (in Garnett’s translation) is “Dmitry Fyodorovich does not yet exist”.
    Thinking this could not possibly be correct, I rushed to the ‘definitive’ P&V version, only to find the EXACT SAME WORDING.
    Ignat Avsey’s version has “DF has not yet arrived”; and at least one of the ‘revised’ Garnett versions also has changed it to something similar.
    A French version I looked at rendered this line as “DF n’est pas encore ici” (DF is not here yet).
    Garnett had spent little time among actual Russian speaking people. Her translations are riddled with inappropriate renderings like the above; or like ‘masticate’ for ‘chew’.
    What’s shocking to me is not that Garnett’s translation is so bad, but rather that a glaring error of this sort is found in PEVEAR/Volokhonsky!
    Assuming that one of them ACTUALLY knows Russian; and that one of them ACTUALLY knows English, there is no way that they could have actually translated that phrase in that manner.
    Garnett probably looked the word up in a dictionary… it’s an unusual Russian word that CAN mean what she wrote, but that can also be used colloquially to mean simply ‘be around’.
    Pevear and his wife would never have made that mistake, and therefore they must have simply picked up Garnett’s version and ‘tweaked’ it… and tweaked it not very thoroughly.

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